Works
Q:  When will the David Randall novel be available?
A:  Let’s just keep our fingers crossed. I am seeking representation from a literary agent.

Q:  Is there anything you can tell us now about the David Randall novels?

A:  They are mostly medical thrillers. The first one, TRADE SECRETS, is set in Boston and Bermuda in 1996. The second one, TERMINAL SECRETS, is a domestic thriller with medical elements. Events occur within a single day in 1999, in Boston, Nantucket, and around Nashua. It's going out to agents soon. The third, STATE SECRETS, is just a sketch as yet but will be a political and medical thriller set in DC and the Florida panhandle a year later. David Randall undergoes several life transformations across the three books. Some characters who make only brief appearances in the first novel play major roles later. There are references to famous Boston fictional characters that should be fun to identify.

Q:  May we see some of your other work now?

A:  Yes, look under the Works pull-down menu, where you'll find links to 8 pieces of short fiction. A ninth is under review. Six of them feature characters from the David Randall novels:  "Martha, Jerry, and Spaulding," "House For Sale," "Broken Angel," "Foreclosure," "Home for Boys," and "The Whittaker Way."  If there are more of these I might collect them in a book someday.

Q:  How long have you been writing?

A:  I started on the first David Randall novel in 2007, and finished in 2011. In between there were several 1-3 month chunks when I worked on short stories or the second or third novel. 

Q:  When do you do your writing?
A:  Every night from 9-11.  Sometimes I'll get away for a few hours during the daytime on a weekend.

Q:  Why did you decide to start writing at your age?  You must be, what, mid-fifties?
A:  At least. I've always done technical writing for my work.   When I was in high school, I started writing some fiction but put it away after deciding I wasn't very good at it.   Same for song-writing.  Then, when I was 51, my first son was born.  In singing lullabies to him I realized I could write songs after all.  That allowed me to rethink fiction.

Q:  Is the medication difluzapine in the first David Randall novel based on a real drug?

A:  How did you hear about difluzapine?  You're on your own on this one. 

Q:  Who ought to play David Randall in the movies?

A:  Good question.  After the first novel is available, maybe we'll change make this the new "Vote For" panel.  My personal favorite is Matt Damon.  He played the patient in Good Will Hunting--maybe he'd like to be the psychiatrist.

Q:  You must know a lot of psychiatrists. Are they all crazy?
A:  You bet.  Each in a different way.
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